The Goblins of Bellwater – Update


MollyRinglesmI wrote about this book back in July, and it was one of the best I read all summer. It is scheduled for publication October 1, just in time for 31 Days of Halloween reading and I highly recommend you find a copy and devour it. In the meantime, here are some goodies for you to enjoy which will certainly whet your appetite for the book.

Author Molly Ringle agreed to some Q&A on Goblins, so enjoy!

How closely did you follow Christina Rossetti’s poem Goblin Market as a basis for the story?

I call this a book “inspired by” Rossetti’s poem rather than saying it’s “based upon” it, because I did veer from the poem a significant amount. I first read the poem a few years ago, and it intrigued me deeply. It’s evocative and strange, and, like a fairy tale, has many symbols and events that could be interpreted as having several different meanings. My assignment to myself was to use it as a jumping-off point for a modern paranormal novel, which would then go its own way as the plot required. What I kept from the poem was the basic surface framework: we have a pair of sisters, grown but on the young side, one of whom becomes enchanted by eating goblin fruit in the forest and begins wasting away as a result, alarming the other sister into seeking a way to save her. Since Rossetti’s poem ends with a fast-forward to the women being “wives” and telling their children about their adventures, and since I wanted to write a paranormal romance anyway, I gave my modern sister characters a pair of men to get involved with, in a double love story with eerie angles that I think match the eeriness of the original poem. Mind you, another interpretation of the poem is that the two women aren’t really sisters but lovers, which would be a different route to take and which I think would be lovely to see too.

What is the significance of the four elements (Earth, Air, Fire, Water) in this story?

The four elements are common fixtures in many ancient cultures, and have remained popular into the modern day. One of my favorite TV shows is Avatar: the Last Airbender, which uses the four-element framework brilliantly in its world-building. In reading up on faery lore for this book, I found that scholars often classify types of fae under the four elements, and since that appealed to me, I did the same. As one of the characters in
The Goblins of Bellwater muses, there’s something human and emotionally real
about looking at nature that way, even if we technically know, thanks to science, that nature contains far more than four elements. And in my novel, the only way to break the goblin spells involves respecting and trusting each of the four elements, even when they’re at their most daunting.

Why do you think fairy tale and other myth and legend retellings are so popular right now?

I think they’ve always been popular! Maybe it’s a case of selection bias, because I personally have always been into ghost stories, fairy tales, and other supernatural lore, but it seems to me that human culture has never stopped telling such stories. As scholars of fairy tales will tell you, reading and writing about fantasy and the paranormal may look like escapism from reality, and sometimes I tell myself that’s what I’m doing, but in truth these stories end up giving us all the useful lessons about real life that any good
stories do: empathy, courage, love, respect for nature and community, and the importance of thinking fancifully and creatively.

Goblins of Bellwater hits the stores October 1, and to celebrate, the publisher is giving away 5 prize packages. Enter the Giveaway

Grand prize package:

  • Signed paperback copy of The Goblins of Bellwater
  • $10 Starbucks gift card
  • “Flowerwatch” necklace/pocket watch
  • Artistic guided journal/sketchbook
  • Copy of Brian Froud’s Goblins!

Air prize package:

  • Signed paperback copy of The Goblins of Bellwater
  • Air-element necklace
  • 1 oz of Goblin Market tea from Dryad Tea

Earth prize package:

  • Signed paperback copy of The Goblins of Bellwater
  • Earth-element necklace
  • 1 oz of Goblin Market tea from Dryad Tea

Fire prize package:

  • Signed paperback copy of The Goblins of Bellwater
  • Fire-element necklace
  • 1 oz of Goblin Market tea from Dryad Tea

Water prize package:

  • Signed paperback copy of The Goblins of Bellwater
  • Water-element necklace
  • 1 oz of Goblin Market tea from Dryad Tea

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s