Gesethmane Brown Series by Alexia Gordon


If you follow this blog, you know that I read mostly mystery and suspense novels. Events of the last year have prompted me to become more aware of who is not represented in the books I read, and I have noticed a lack of black and brown characters and authors in the mysteries I tend to read.

I was was happy to discover the Gesethmane Brown series by Alexia Gordon a few weeks ago, and have spent some quality time burning through the 5 books in the series.

The first in the series, Murder in G Major, introduces us to Gesethmane Brown. Gesethmane is an accomplished African-American violinist and conductor, a Maestra, who finds herself stranded in the small Irish village of Dunmullach where she accepts temporary lodging in a quaint cottage formerly owned by one of her musical heroes, Eamon McCarthy. Little does she know that she will soon become acquainted with McCarthy’s ghost, who convinces her that his death and that of his wife did not happen as reported.

Gesethmane also accepts a position as music teacher to a group of unruly boys who need a firm hand to get their orchestra in shape for an all-county competition. As she navigates the school, village, and her ghostly roommate, the series structure is slowly built. Gesethmane quickly becomes the (fond) thorn-in-the-side of local garda (police) Iollan O’Reilly, and makes friends with the local parish priest Fr. Tim and with fellow teacher Frankie Grennan. These three, along with Eamon, form the basis of Gesethmane’s support team in the series.

There are 5 books in the series with each titled using a musical term. Gesethmane’s work as a musician is acknowledged throughout the series as being world-class, and she is clearly the one in charge in each book. She is smart, funny, loyal, and determined.

Gordon builds upon Gesethmane’s relationships in each book, revealing more about her past life and that of the village. The addition of the ghost is a fun aspect to the series, which places this in good company with other paranormal mysteries. The writing is skillful and the plots interesting. These are fun, cozy mysteries that will provide a few hours of entertainment for the reader.

I listened to the audiobooks of all 5 and preferred the narrator of 2-4, although the “southern” accent attributed to Gesethmane seems contrived (she’s from Virginia) and was often jarring. City of Rochester readers, all 5 titles are available in audio form through Hoopla. All you need is your library card.